Hobbs News Sun

McCoy’s celebrates 30 years of lumber cutting

McCoy’s Building Supply manager Tyler Louis cut through a 2-by-4 board in under 10 seconds with a sharp hand saw to the applause of about 50 well wishers celebrating the company’s 30 years in Hobbs on Thursday.

Originally founded by Frank McCoy in 1927 as the McCoy Roofing Company in Galveston, the expanding company came to Hobbs in May 1988. The company is now headquartered in San Marcos, Texas.

McCoy’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, Meagan McCoy Jones of Austin, said, “This is a treat for us. We’re a fourth generation family business. Not a lot of companies stay in business this long and we know we’re beating a lot of odds to do that.”

With a total of 87 stores in five states, Jones explained with a smile, “At McCoy’s, we cut a board. We don’t cut a ribbon. We’re in the lumber business.”

Participants in the Hobbs celebration included representatives of the Hobbs Chamber of Commerce, the Hobbs Hispano Chamber of Commerce, Habitat for Humanity and Care-a-Vanners, officials of other McCoy’s stores in New Mexico and Texas, several distributors, and local employees and family members.

Presenting a certificate to Jones, Hobbs chamber past president Shannon Bush said, “Thirty years in anything is remarkable, but 30 years in business is extraordinary.” The chain itself has now hit 91 years.

Louis introduced many of his 15 employees after remarking, “Thirty years ago, I wasn’t even born. This is a cool experience for me. I’ve only been with the company a little over two years. (Hobbs is) a great community and we’ve seen huge growth since I came here in January.”

Originally from Missouri, he acknowledged moving to Hobbs involved a culture shock, but he’s come to enjoy living and working here.

City Commissioner Dwayne Penick, a construction contractor, recalled the 1988 opening of McCoy’s in Hobbs. Before that time, contractors dealt with much smaller suppliers or ordered supplies from out-of-town.

“It’s been great for the development of Hobbs,” Penick said. “When we got McCoy’s we were ecstatic.”

According to the company’s website, McCoy’s dug in its heals around 1995 with the advent of Home Depot and Lowe’s, but maintained its family culture, including never opening on Sunday, the day “we build family values.”

After the board-cutting ceremony, McCoy’s hosted lunch for participants in a massive bay behind the store where product distributors had set up convention-style booths and tables to show their wares.